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A LEVEL LAW BOOKS

Our collection of Law Books

THE A LEVEL LAW COURSE

The function that law performs in society is critical and multifaceted. The protection of the public, the regulation of relationships, the formation of agreements, and the mediation and settlement of conflicts are all duties that it performs.

The "case study" method, in which legal ideas are applied to real-life scenarios, is one of the aspects of the A level Law curriculum that students find especially enjoyable. The perfect set of notes for A Level Law. For instance:

Law books

HOW TO WRITE A CASE NOTE
USING THE IRAC METHOD

 

General Principle: First legal formulation of duty of care to identify negligence: The Neighbour’s test.

 

Donoghue v Stevenson [1932] AC 562 (old law)    

Facts: Two friends went to a Café and one of the two bought a bottle of ginger beer. Part of the drink was poured over the ice cream float that Mrs Donoghue consumed. The rest was poured into a glass by the friend who bought the beer. A decomposed snail came out of the bottle. Mrs Donoghue fell sick after consuming the drink and sued the manufacturer of the beer for shock and gastroenteritis. Ratio: Neighbour’s principle test: “You must love your neighbour. You must take reasonable care to avoid acts or omissions which you can reasonably foresee would be likely to injure your neighbour”. Your neighbour is someone “closely and directly affected by my act that I ought reasonably to have in contemplation as being so affected” (per Lord Atkin). Application: The manufacturer owed a duty of care to the ultimate consumer. The absence of a contract between the parties did not exclude the presence of duty of care against the manufacturer.

Law book

WRITING ANOTHER CASENOTE
USING AN IRAC METHOD?

 

General Principle: In case of a continuing act, it is enough that the Defendant had mens rea at some point during the act. This is known as the ‘continuing act theory’.

 

Fagan v Metropolitan Police Commissioner [1969] 1QB 439

Facts: Fagan drove on a policeman’s foot accidentally. When asked to move off his foot by the policeman, Fagan refused to comply. He was charged with assaulting a police officer in the execution of his duty. At the time of driving on the foot, which was actus reus of the crime he did not have mens rea. Ratio: Whether an action of the Defendant is not at first criminal since the Defendant has no mens rea, but it becomes criminal when the Defendant intentionally decides to carry out the action, the exact coincidence between the two elements become irrelevant. Application: Even though the defendant did not have the mens rea at the beginning of his unlawful action, he had it at some point during the act. Therefore, the Defendant was convicted since he intentionally left the wheel on the officer’s foot.

A LEVEL LAW

 

The fact that narratives about real individuals and discussions of genuine issues that need to be solved are both included in the content of the A level in Law course makes it both more engaging and more challenging to study.

Although the AQA is the most often used exam board for the study of A level Law, other boards provide a specification that is functionally equivalent. An introduction to A level law following is provided below:

Nature of Law: This investigates the connection between law and society, as well as morality and justice, and delves into key ideas such the "Rule of Law" and "Parliamentary Sovereignty".

Our Constitutional and Administrative Law book is the ideal study guide for A level law students who want to consolidate their existing knowledge and get the highest possible grades. You will be able to rapidly learn the essential ideas of this field of law and succeed in both your examinations and homework if you use this resource since it provides a clear and concise presentation of all the important issues.

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Constitutinal and Administrative Law

A LEVEL LAW

 

The English Legal System: In this subject, you will focus on how laws are produced both centrally within parliament and through the judgements reached by appeals courts. You get an understanding of the most important institutions of the legal system, such as the hierarchy of the civil and criminal courts, as well as the numerous procedures and persons engaged in the practise of law.

Criminal law: In the context of criminal law, this includes not only fatal offences against the person (such as murder, voluntary and involuntary manslaughter), but also non-fatal offences against the person (such as assault, battery, actual bodily harm, and grievous bodily harm), as well as property offences. Additionally, the philosophy of criminal law is studied in order to offer context.

Our Core book offers a reliable foundational level of knowledge in the subject matter of A level law. It then adds to this information to guarantee that students are able to apply the substantive law using a number of abilities in a range of circumstances. This is done to ensure that students are prepared for the real world. After that, our Q&A book instructs students on how to interact with the topic, as well as how to conduct an in-depth analysis and think about how the law applies to a variety of different scenarios.

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A LEVEL LAW

 

Tort law: on the A level you will investigate a variety of "wrongs," or torts, such as negligence and private nuisance. It also investigates notions like as "liability" and deals with the "remedies" that are made accessible by the courts.

The goal of the authors and designers of these books is to ensure your success. The core guides go above and above, consolidating your learning, focussing your revision, and maximising your test success. They are written by specialists and cover all of the major themes. Each guide provides you with all of the information you want, arranged in a manner that is centred on a breakdown of the most important themes and instances.

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A LEVEL LAW

 

Option choice: Studying either Human Rights or Contract Law is an option that is available to you. The subject of Human Rights examines the historical progression of human rights as well as the legal philosophy that underpins the contemporary approach. Contract law examines the fundamental elements of a binding agreement, including an offer, an acceptance, consideration, and the parties' desire to form legal relations.

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A LEVEL LAW

 

Option choice: Studying either Human Rights or Contract Law is an option that is available to you. The subject of Human Rights examines the historical progression of human rights as well as the legal philosophy that underpins the contemporary approach. Contract law examines the fundamental elements of a binding agreement, including an offer, an acceptance, consideration, and the parties' desire to form legal relations.

WHAT IS EXPECTED OF YOU?

The A level study of law involves activities such as thinking, writing, arguing, and learning. You will study how to debate, both on paper and in class, to develop and defend your opinions on how legal concepts apply to particular circumstances. You will need to be able to grasp precise use of language and be able to write coherently. You also need to have a good recollection for the people involved and the events that transpired in the important cases.

 

WHAT BACKGROUND DO I NEED?

 

To begin the A Level Law programme, you do not require any previous understanding of Law. However, you do need a good complement of GCSEs. If you get largely 4s and 5s in GCSE exams, you may discover that A-level law is rather challenging. The majority of schools need a score of seven or above on the English GCSE. If you are required to write essays using specific legal terminology to explain and evaluate the current law in terms of concepts like fairness, morality, and justice; or if you are required to use logical reasoning to assess liability, then you need to have a good command of the English language. If you are required to write essays using specific legal terminology to explain and evaluate the current law in terms of concepts like fairness, morality, and justice. However, it is of the utmost importance that you have a sincere interest in the Law, including its development, its applications, and its institutions. This will put you on the path to success as well as happiness.

 

WHERE CAN IT LEAD?

 

In addition to being inherently intriguing, doing an A-level in Law offers students a taste of what Law is like at the university level (although it is not necessary), and it gives them a head start in comparison to students who have never studied Law before.

 

Students whose A level subject combination satisfies criteria for both "breadth" and "skills" are encouraged to apply to university law faculties, according to research that was conducted by AQA. University law schools welcome applications from students who have done A level Law.

 

Those who have no plans to major read law at the university level may nevertheless benefit from doing A Level Law. It is thought-provoking, encourages critical thinking, and deals with topical subjects such as the "right to die" and the legal ramifications of Brexit. All of these things make it an engaging read. It covers a wide range of applicable skills and information that are highly sought in a variety of professional fields.

 

CAN I DO A LEVEL LAW IN ONE YEAR?

 

It is possible to perform well in one year, but it is quite tough to accomplish so. It is not so much the quantity of information that you need to acquire in order to pass A level Law as it is how well you can develop the advanced thinking and writing abilities in that period.

 

THE A LEVEL ASSESMENT

 

The final exam for A level Law will be taken after completion of the course. The AQA assesses students' knowledge of law through the administration of three tests, each of which consists of a number of multiple-choice questions, questions requiring both short and extended essays, and problem scenarios to which you are required to apply the law in order to determine liability.

  • Paper 1 explores criminal law,

  • Paper 2 investigates tort law, and

  • Paper 3 investigates either contract law or human rights, depending on the student's chosen choice.

 

The evaluation of the components dealing with the Nature of the Law and the English Legal Systems is dispersed among the three examinations and accounts for 25 percent of the total marks.